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photo by Ian Byers Gamber

Chris Kallmyer is a sound artist and performer living in Los Angeles. His work explores a participatory approach to making music through touch, taste, and process using everyday objects that point to who we are and where we live. His work is best characterized by its relationship to site and architecture, inviting the listener to experience sound in situ.

In 2016, he was the first Performance Fellow at the newly reopened San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where he created works that address their new building designed by Craig Dykers of Snøhetta. Thousands of museum visitors participated in impromptu concerts that ritualized the relationship between the body, sound, and architecture. Prior to that, Kallmyer was an Artist Fellow at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation in St Louis, where he created a set of earthenware chimes from regional clay sources in collaboration with local artists and activists.

Kallmyer’s work has garnered commissions from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Walker Art Center, Hammer Museum, Pulitzer Arts Foundation, The Getty Center, Berkeley Art Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, The Biennial of the Americas, Chicago Cultural Center, Indianapolis Museum of Art, and the City of Los Angeles.

Kallmyer completed his MFA in 2009 at California Institute of the Arts while studying with Wadada Leo Smith, Wolfgang von Schweinitz, Aashish Khan, and Sara Roberts. Since then, Kallmyer has worked closely with the art collective Machine Project (LA) creating over 100 projects since 2009 at institutions across the United States. As a performer, Chris plays with the modern-music-collective wild Up, who the New York Times called “…a raucous, grungy, irresistibly exuberant…fun-loving, exceptionally virtuosic family.” Chris is their acting guitarist, multi-instrumentalist, and thought-leader, helping the band to embrace an emergent practice in cross-disciplinary work.